BLOG

Feelings are a life-saving device

By Delphine du Toit | February 21, 2014

It’s a short trip from contemplating physical pain to reflecting on psychic pain. What is the evolutionary purpose behind emotional pain? If evolution has brought us to where we are now, with our anxieties, fears, anger, depression and drug dependency, what were the original benefits of such emotions?
Consider how readily you reach for a painkiller when you have a bit of a headache, a spell of arthritis or a sprained ankle. You’ve experienced the pain and had enough of it. Your primary desire is to suppress it – if you can’t make it go away then at least you can suppress it. Perhaps there’s a deeper message in the pain though –

I'd appreciate you sharing this post with your networks.Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email

I can walk away…I always walk away.

By Delphine du Toit | February 7, 2014

I keep learning the benefits of choosing how to respond to a conflict situation. I learnt the truth that there is no single objective truth; just a range of perspectives. I also learnt the healing power of truth and reconciliation. The peace of mind that comes from taking time to understand and to be understood is one of the greatest destressors I have ever come across. It is a cornerstone for good mental health.
This isn’t a newly invented “app”: aboriginal societies and the major world religions know the value of dialog and creating common understanding.

I'd appreciate you sharing this post with your networks.Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email

Atlantic Meditation: from mindless to mindful

By Delphine du Toit | December 20, 2013


 My soul is full of longing

 For the secret of the Sea,

And
the heart of the great ocean

 Sends a thrilling pulse through me.

         The Secret of the Sea – Henry Wadsworth
Longfellow

I’ve spent quite a few
hours in the past week mindlessly staring at the movement of the Atlantic Ocean.  I normally live on the edge of the same ocean some 21 degrees of latitude to the north, but I don’t do this at
home.  I stopped just gazing out at the ocean for hours about six weeks after I moved in.

Sure, I still look up out
of curiosity when a container ship passes too close by the house for my liking. Every time I see a submarine slink in or out of the harbour I think of the U-boats and the net spanned …

I'd appreciate you sharing this post with your networks.Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email

TELL-TALE SIGNS OF STALE BLOGS

By Delphine du Toit | November 5, 2013

Google is no longer impressed by SEO and key words.  Its bots focus on websites that are active:  regular updating of information through
content refreshing, blogging, articles posted, and the like.

When did you last post a blog or an article on your website?  Do you have it built into your schedule or is it one of those things that started as a
good intention but keeps sliding?

A SIGN OF HUMAN INTELLIGENCE IS PATTERN RECOGNITION  

When I visit a …

I'd appreciate you sharing this post with your networks.Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email

Don’t feed the Black Dog of Depression

By Delphine du Toit | July 10, 2012

Sir Winston Churchill was prone to depression. He called his depressions his ‘black dog’. Now, I know that not all black dogs are miserable or skulk around in corners, but imagine what you
feel like when you are depressed. More than that, maybe you’re depressed right now, so you don’t even have to imagine it – you can just experience it. I’ll connect the black dog dots for
you.

It starts without you knowing that it has started: Something distant and abstract – remote, even, in your subconscious. A sense of unease swirls around you like …

I'd appreciate you sharing this post with your networks.Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email