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Fundamental need for fairness is confounded by our cultural expression of it.

Fairness is simple. Bring culture into it and bedevil everything.

By Delphine du Toit | October 27, 2015

The way of breaking through cultural barriers to fairness is to return to our human origins. Fairness is the default position; culture is the way in which we express and judge it. The more culturally divergent a workplace is the less likely it is we’d have consensus on what constitutes ‘fairness’.
This paper explores Brown’s human fundamentals via Pinker; Frans de Waal’s research on the moral behaviour of animals; and then human culture via Hofstede, with a view of stimulating HR to look at how they ‘do’ fairness differently. What is being done currently doesn’t quite meet the human standard of fairness.

And so, how does one set that standard? The answers are in your approach and your level of cultural competence.

Some ideas are offfered on how fairness might be viewed and enacted differently – if someone has the curiosity and courage to do it.

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Toddler Transport for Leadership Learning

5 Leadership Outcomes offered by the Trudeau Leadership School (TLS)

By Delphine du Toit | October 23, 2015

The Trudeau Leadership School offers an innovative child-transportation method that builds leadership in the next generation, as can be seen in the featured photograph. 1. Close physical contact with Dad without being mushy or coddled. 2. Eyes forward to take it all in. 3. Build responsibility for keeping self in balance with just enough support to make…

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Use the right tool for the job

By Delphine du Toit | February 19, 2015

I am going to talk about two things that have happened this week. On the face of it they may not appear to be related, but if one moves away from the detail – the ‘what happened’ or the ‘what is’, to the abstract where you might explore themes and lessons learnt, they are very closely related.

Firstly, it is about kitty litter as a tool….

I had just come from a coaching session with a client. This is the second thing I want to talk about. We had been discussing employee engagement surveys….

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Stress is the snow on the road

By Delphine du Toit | February 11, 2015

As with blizzards and clippers, stress events can be forecast if somebody knows what the precipitating patterns will be and then can explain it to the rest of us in ways that we can relate to. A typical example of a major stress event that could have been, and maybe even was, forecast, is the abject collapse of Target in Canada. Failure to pay rent? A no-brainer for those of us who are or have been tenants or landlords. A clear and distinct signal. It is said that Target misjudged the Canadian market. 17,000 people are going to lose their jobs. Why? Did no-one read the signs? Not tell them about it? Or maybe there weren’t any other options?

Let’s consider what happens when we misjudge the severity of a winter storm: people are over-confident in undertaking road trips and skid into ditches

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